Thursday, August 16, 2012

TAVR Performed At UCLA First In The USA

One of the many diseases we echocardiographers find when we examine a patients heart is aortic stenosis. Aortic stenosis results when the aortic valve leaflets are unable to open properly allowing blood to flow from the heart to the body with vital oxygen. Aortic stenosis (AS) is fairly common and can seriously affect a persons life by limiting physical activities.   Symptoms such as shortness of breath, syncope, and peripheral edema are common.  Until recently, open heart surgery to replace the damaged aortic valve had to be performed to alleviate the most serious form of this cardiac valve disease.  Now, doctors at UCLA have performed a successful minimally-invasive aortic valve replacement on a human. Enjoy the link!




http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-ucla-device-aortic-valve-patients.html
(Medical Xpress) -- UCLA has performed its first transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), using a new device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to replace an aortic valve in a patient who was not a candidate for open-heart surgery. The procedure took place on Aug. 9.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-ucla-device-aortic-valve-patients.html#jCp
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is part of a growing trend of hospitals nationwide offering this new minimally invasive procedure. As the U.S. population ages, an increasing number of patients will develop aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the heart's aortic valve caused by calcium deposits, which impedes blood flow, causing the heart to work harder to pump blood to the body and placing patients at higher risk of heart failure or death.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-ucla-device-aortic-valve-patients.html#jCp
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is part of a growing trend of hospitals nationwide offering this new minimally invasive procedure. As the U.S. population ages, an increasing number of patients will develop aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the heart's aortic valve caused by calcium deposits, which impedes blood flow, causing the heart to work harder to pump blood to the body and placing patients at higher risk of heart failure or death.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-ucla-device-aortic-valve-patients.html#jCp
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is part of a growing trend of hospitals nationwide offering this new minimally invasive procedure. As the U.S. population ages, an increasing number of patients will develop aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the heart's aortic valve caused by calcium deposits, which impedes blood flow, causing the heart to work harder to pump blood to the body and placing patients at higher risk of heart failure or death.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-ucla-device-aortic-valve-patients.html#jCp
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