Friday, September 1, 2017

Sonography a First Defense in Infectious Disease After Hurricane Harvey

Nice to be home after over 80 hours living, and breathing taking care of the sick in one of the only hospitals open to accepting people from many counties, and cities.  God Bless the staff at  El Campo Memorial Hospital.  Yes, send donations there.  We brought in a brigade of selfless medical Pro, fed, them, and did not gripe.  Not one word.

I attended to the needy, and not so needy.  I am happy to return home to my family who missed me.  I missed them.

On to the crux of the post.  Infections!

To all health care providers, please know that infectious disease is the bane of any cataclysm.

Sonography aided me this week in identifying possible abcesses three times  All three were taken care of with antibiotics, and I/D.  Use your skills to put the numbers together, and help the ED docs get them off to the next medical step.

Keep your probes Clean!  The worst thing from a storms aftermath is infections.  This includes insect, dog, or reptile bites.  I treated an Army National Guardsman for a gall bladder issue, but that is enough to take him off of front line rescue.

All mumps, and lumps should be treated as possible infections.  Be safe, and wash everything.

I saw two patients with infections caused by animal, or insect bites this week.

Be sure the water we drink is bottled.  Use only bottled water for oral wash, and do not bathe the chrildren in tap water regardless of how the water tastes.

Use bleach on everything, but No time spell check.
do not drink it.  Internet is fading, be well, and God Bless.


Folk's this is one of those time.


   Tom Whelan

  

Friday, August 25, 2017

Things Are Always Big In Texas

A couple notes:  I am sorry I have not posted in a while.  There have been some family issues including death of some friends and relatives.  I have been distracted, but my family is second after God.  The unusual political climate has tempered my usual verve to post articles of a scientific nature.  And, lastly, our great state of Texas is under the trebuchets of nature.  Harvey (pictured on Friday morning), is growing bigger than the hulk when he is pissed off.

I have signed up to attend the SDMS convention in Dallas October 13/15.  I hope to see many old Sonographers, and meet new people over that weekend.  I expect to have some ultrasound news to share with you then.

The end of the earth is not going to happen anytime soon, but I would like to lighten the load with the with an excerpt and link to a very good writer who views things from a unique perspective.

Back in 2002 or 2003, I worked with a guy who was convinced that 9-11 was an event planned by the CIA to declare martial law and take our guns from us. The “take our guns from us” thing took a life of its own during the Obama years even though there were no guns taken from anyone. That didn’t matter to those who feed on Conspiracy Theories. All that really matters is there be a theory made from whole cloth and for that theory to address some deep and dark fear. The more baseless these fears are the deeper they seem to be. Like people being afraid of snakes.
Seriously, this guy poured a six-inch slab for a doomsday bunker, stocked it with about fifty thousand bucks worth of guns and ammo, and inside that bunker is enough room for he and his family to stand around and stare at the guns. He’s been gone for a while, went off to another part of the world to work, but today he came back.

courtesy of   http://mikefiresmith.blogspot.com/

May everyone in the path of Harvey be safe.  Use your head, and beware of reptiles in the event of flooding.  And watch for fire ant balls.  (look that one up)  TJW

Friday, June 30, 2017

Ultrasound and MRI are dating.

We do not see the train on the track.

Here is new stuff that may save lives.  Sonographers Blog lives.  Note that Ultrasound had a hand in this wonderful
Source, below,
and Thank you.  TJW

Nanoparticle based contrast agent developed for dual modal imaging of cancer

Date:
June 20, 2017
Source:
World Scientific
Summary:
Dual modal imaging which shares the advantages of two imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging, has the ability to produce images with higher spatial resolution and higher sensitivity. Contrast agents having both magnetic and optical properties identifies the cancer cells efficiently. Europium doped gadolinium oxide nanorods were synthesized and subsequently coated with silica to improve the biocompatibility.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

PTSD, New Treatment

Good day, all, I saw an article yesterday about using an anesthesia block on a nerve that controls something to do with the horror of trauma.  I am posting from a Windows device.  It is slow and sloppy.  This nerve block in the neck has some promise of neutralizing some nervous systems want to kill another person.  I am not sure.  If effective, it may promise some new hope for our troops with PTSD.  My Windows tablet will not allow me to post the link.  Go to Drudge, and find the link.  Look in his archives.  I am busy with other things.  I will be back.  TJW  PS, this is for you, John.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Old Ultrasound is back again

New Doppler sound database could help those suffering from heart conditions

Date:
February 15, 2017
Source:
University of Huddersfield
Summary:
Handheld devices can scan the lower limbs of a patient and 'listen' to the blood flow, providing vital early indication of problems that could lead to strokes or heart attacks.  But inexperience or lack of training sometimes mean that clinicians do not properly interpret what they hear and therefore miss the warning signs. Now a new research project aims to build a digital library of the different foot and leg artery sounds recorded during the Doppler ultrasound procedure.

Note:  We have been using the ABI index for over 50+ years.  Happy Easter!

Friday, April 7, 2017

A Tale Of My Travels While Teaching Ultrasound (One of Several Stories)


I have taught medical ultrasound to doctors and medical professionals around the world (see archives).  There are many stories of travel we all like to share when we leave our home country to travel to other countries, and experience other cultures.  I will begin this series by apologizing for my absence.  My wife and child have been plagued by a set of misfortunes which have made me devote most of my time to see to their wellbeing.  All is well at the moment, so I thought I would take a few moments to blog again.

I present one story, of many I want to post of the

sideline stories seasoned travelers may find amusing, and new travelers may find helpful.

Hong Kong Snake Dinner

 Here we have a true tale of a dinner party that was something out of a food TV show with a nice bald twist.  I lost my hair when I was thirty, and have not missed it.  I have only the look of a Friar from a monastery.  Most of my Chinese hosts have a full head of hair, so I guess I was labeled as a popular food critic from the USA.  My Chinese host physicians made a point of taking me and my associate out for sumptuous lunches every day during our three week stays in Hong Kong.  My coworker was female, and lunches were always a great, and very social event with the large table dominated by three pots of hot tea (green, Oolong, and another tea).  The Chinese take great care to pour tea for guests, because they are special.  In the Chinese culture, it is disrespectful to turn away food or drink when served by the host, in this respect it was my Chinese students who chose to respect a teacher, I later found out.

Our lunches were always proper, with white table cloth, Western silver settings, and several dishes.  My associate and I loved these social events because they took over an hour, but we tired of the endless array of dishes served out.  We were ready to get back to teaching these wonderful people how to perform sonograms, and get back to the hotel to get a good night sleep.  Jet lag had a part in this, of course..

One night, a male cohort of physicians enticed me out to join them in an ultimate male bonding ritual: Snake Dinner.  (See the links below)

Note, this offer of dinner was not extended to my female associate for cultural reasons.  I cannot explain that.  She graciously declined.  I was picked up by a pack of wonderful medical doctors, and off we went.

So, here we go out  walk like usual to a restaurant for supper, rather than lunch. I Love
 to walk, and I am amazed at how fit the Chinese people are.  Most walk if possible to work, or for meals.  The streets are full of the usual honking, and hordes of people, but all was very orderly, and my attention quickly turned to olfactory rather than dodging pedestrians.  Hong Kong is a city of smells.  You understand this when you get off the M-subway for the first time.  It Is Smell!  the melange can overwhelm a western person.


After many blocks through Kowloon, we are ushered into a small restaurant and seated at a large table, and immediately served with bottles of rice liquor.  My host party set upon me like a pack, and attempt to make me drunk by refilling my small cup multiple times with a hellish rice moonshine.  I learned quickly not to down the drink.  It was apparent that to do so would spark a rush of eager hosts willing to refill my small cup with more brimstone.

Then the Snake Man made his entrance with his eyes  on me.  I was the only Gadjin in the
party of twelve.

approached the table with a cart of hissing serpents.  He held my gaze and asked which snake?  He said they are all poisonous cobras. He seemed miffed that I would ask such a stupid question.

He took the snake from the cage, and used a green scalpel to gut it it for food.  To be fried, and presented in a western manner.  Google deleted my first post for some reason.  TJW

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Focused Ultrasound Treatments are Effective Against Certain Cancers








Update: Liver Cancer Treated With Focused Ultrasound Treatments are becoming more main-stream.

I have been watching the evolution of ultrasound treatment for many diseases.  Ultrasound was first used as a diagnostic tool in the early 1900's, but has rapidly evolved into a multi-disciplinary medical tool in the last 50 years or so.  I try to stay on top of these wonderful discoveries in medical circles, but it is staggering.  Thanks so much for hanging with me while I cull through the many articles, and bring you the most succinct, and important news I can find so you may do your own research.

here is a link to some new information.

https://draft.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=4439747121319831768#editor/target=post;postID=2393307912897160582

TJW

PS:  I am still working out some bugs with Blogger.  Please bear with me.  mainly lag, and an unresponsive interface