Monday, December 3, 2012

Spinach Is Safer Thanks To Ultrasound

Excellent!  Spinach is now safer than ever to eat thanks to ultrasound sterilization.  A few years back spinach got a bad rap because a batch got contaminated with some bacteria and made many people sick.  New ultrasound technology allows farmers to better eliminate bacteria and other pathogens by using ultrasound energy to destroy these bugs without harming the spinach.  I am a spinach lover, and glad for this because I especially love fresh spinach salads.  Here is my recipe for a fresh bag of cooked spinach:



1 bag of fresh spinach
balsamic vinegar
butter
black pepper
MAGGI liquid seasoning

Wash the bagged spinach (Even though it says it is already washed) then pat dry.  Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a pot and dump the whole spinach in and cook over low-medium heat about 5 minutes and stir.  Add MAGGI to taste, then 2 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar. black pepper to taste.  Enjoy!

"By combining continuous ultrasound treatment with chlorine washing, we can reduce the total number of food-borne pathogenic bacteria by over 99.99 percent," said Hao Feng,professor of food science and human nutrition."

Here is the link.  Thanks Sonoworld 

http://phys.org/news/2012-11-safer-spinach-scientist-technique-coli.html
Safer spinach? Scientist's technique dramatically reduces E. coli numbers November 27, 2012 University of Illinois scientists have found a way to boost current industry capabilities when it comes to reducing the number of E. coli 0157:H7 cells that may live undetected on spinach leaves.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-safer-spinach-scientist-technique-coli.html#jCp
According to Feng, the USDA is looking for proposed technologies that can achieve a 4 to 6 log reduction in pathogen cells (a 6 log reduction would achieve a million-fold reduction in pathogenic bacteria). The food processing industry can now achieve a 1 log or tenfold reduction. In comparison, the U of I technique yields a 4 log reduction. "Combining technologies is the key to bridging the gap between our current capacity and what USDA would like to see. The use of ultrasound exposure during chlorine washing gives the industry a way to significantly enhance microbial safety," he said.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-safer-spinach-scientist-technique-coli.html#jCp
"By combining continuous ultrasound treatment with chlorine washing, we can reduce the total number of foodborne pathogenic bacteria by over 99.99 percent," said Hao Feng, a U of I professor of food science and human nutrition. According to Feng, the USDA is looking for proposed technologies that can achieve a 4 to 6 log reduction in pathogen cells (a 6 log reduction would achieve a million-fold reduction in pathogenic bacteria). The food processing industry can now achieve a 1 log or tenfold reduction. In comparison, the U of I technique yields a 4 log reduction. "Combining technologies is the key to bridging the gap between our current capacity and what USDA would like to see. The use of ultrasound exposure during chlorine washing gives the industry a way to significantly enhance microbial safety," he said.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-safer-spinach-scientist-technique-coli.html#jCp
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